Quantum Relativity

Two previous posts introduced the Theory of Space as consisting of four states. This post applies the specific concept of time as empty space in motion from the Theory of Space and substitutes that concept within the General Theory of Relativity. When the General Theory of Relativity was proposed it was not known that the universe was expanding, it was assumed that the universe was in a steady state. The Theory of Space takes into account that we live within an expanding universe, constantly moving.

dt/dr = +/- 1 / (1 – (2GM/r))

In the above formula, replace dt with time = empty space in motion (t = esm) and how does that change how we think about the result. Prior to this adjustment we were tripping over the changes in time and space as defined within a black hole; now we are just dealing with the contraction and expansion of space within a black hole as a singularity. As filled space becomes more dense, empty space approaches infinity. There is no need for time, just space.

This adjustment can then be extended to the quantum level since we are dealing with a singularity which combines filled (mass) space with empty space, the ultimate contraction and expansion of space. That is the missing piece of the equation. Once time is replaced by empty space in motion we have a singular model for dealing with relativity and quantum mechanics. It was time that was the major stumbling block to combining quantum mechanics with relativity.

Another thought related to black hole singularities.  It has been hypothesized that the universe is a hologram.  What if, the black hole singularity is a hologram?  How would that change our thinking about spacetime and entanglement?

About Dr Fiene

Dr. Rick Fiene has spent his professional career in improving the quality of child care in various states, nationally, and internationally. He has done extensive research and publishing on the key components in improving child care quality through an early childhood program quality indicator model of training, technical assistance, quality rating & improvement systems, professional development, mentoring, licensing, risk assessment, differential program monitoring, and accreditation. Dr. Fiene is a retired professor of human development & psychology (Penn State University) where he was department head and director of the Capital Area Early Childhood Research and Training Institute.
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